The Last Word in Last Mile

 

Quality of service for Internet and telephony is determined by the quality of the link from you to where your breakout is. Referred to as last mile, this connection is often sorely overlooked despite its significance.

 

Choosing the right network operator is daunting. Your communications depend on the quality of the line that connects your business to the world, literally. Saving on a seemingly cheaper option ultimately lands up costing you more: in hours of frustration, call-outs and unnecessary upgrades.

 

Last mile mediums include DSL copper cables, satellite, fibre and our preferred methodology, wireless. Brandon Williams, Regional manager for BitCo in the North West province explains why, “The medium used as last mile connectivity can affect the time it takes to implement as well as cost and the quality of the service that the provider is able to provide.  I believe that using fixed wireless is the best way to get a good balance, time to implement is minimal, and equipment costs are constantly coming down as the market expands worldwide. As technology evolves, wireless quality and speeds are improving in leaps and bounds.”

 

Although the name implies a mile, the distance for this connection is often more. With Wireless connectivity distances of up to 10km are achievable. It is also the more cost effective technology as the expense of laying physical cables are waivered as there are none. Fault detection and fail over can be remotely managed in seconds, making it far more reliable. Finally link upgrades for increased capacity are rapidly deployed.

 

When choosing your telephony and Internet service provider, make sure you know who is behind the last mile connection. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about the link and methodology used, ask about service level agreements and uptime guarantees. Failure to receive answers on this could already be an answer in itself. When it comes to last mile connectivity, make sure you have the last word.

 

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